Changes

==Artwork==
Of the artwork, Rob Sheridan went on to state: "For Nine Inch Nails' album, we created logos representing each song, and embedded them in the MP3s to give each song its own visual identity when played digitally. Each logo played upon the meaning or title of the song, sometimes overtly, sometimes very abstractly. A scribbled red line crossed into most of the images, struggling to find harmony with the shapes, but ultimately failing." In a Patreon Q&A sessionpost[https://www.patreon.com/posts/rob-sheridan-ama-3427842762654005], Rob Sheridan was asked about the art for "Demon Seed" and he explained that it was "the end of inspiration behind the journey of the red line that moved through the artwork of that record, trying to make sense of the rigid forms, sometimes fighting them, before finally overtaking them. It was Trentalbum cover:<blockquote>''The Slip's idea to have the line take over 'Demon Seed' so completely/aggressively. It tied in s cover was a direct homage to the meaning behind the musicthis 1982 Cieslewicz poster (for a Paris exhibition on town planning, which isn't my place to discuss as TR tends to keep that stuff close to his chest."of all things):
According As soon as I showed it to Trent he was struck by it, and we wanted to create something similar for the cover. So the intent of the photo was very clear from the beginning, and that helped me choose the right tools to execute it with. I set up a black backdrop and a bright desk lamp (to get a hot, overexposed light source that would sharply fall off into shadow) in a back room during Lights In The Sky rehearsals in 2008. NIN keyboardist Alessandro Cortini stood in as our arm model, and I had Trent walk forwards into the frame and then had Alessandro physically grab Trent's shoulder and jerk him back slightly to stop him. This created the motion blur on Trent's face that communicated the action in the image, captured with a slow-ish shutter speed. We did a few takes, and I was able to let them go back to rehearsals after maybe fifteen minutes of shooting - that was all I needed to get the right raw materials. I found the perfect capture from the shoot, edited it in Photoshop, and then took it into Exposure, modifying the vintage B&W daguerreotype high contrast preset to give the photo the softness, heavy grain, and blown-out photocopy look we were inspired by in Cieslewicz's poster. From there, I added the broken red bar design element and the same worn paper texture used throughout ''The Slip'''s art to unify it.</blockquote>  Of the individual track artwork, Sheridan stated: "For Nine Inch Nails' album, we created logos representing each song, and embedded them in the MP3s to give each song its own visual identity when played digitally. Each logo played upon the meaning or title of the song, sometimes overtly, sometimes very abstractly. A scribbled red line crossed into most of the images, struggling to find harmony with the shapes, but ultimately failing." In a Patreon Q&A session[httphttps://soundwww.jppatreon.com/hardlisteningposts/interviews/modwheelmood2_1.html Japanese interview] with [[modwheelmood]rob-sheridan-ama-34278427], Sheridan was asked about the hand on art for "Demon Seed" and he explained that it was "the end of the cover journey of ''The Slip'' is the red line that moved through the artwork of Alessandro Cortinithat record, while trying to make sense of the shoulder is Reznorrigid forms, sometimes fighting them, before finally overtaking them. It was Trent'sidea to have the line take over 'Demon Seed' so completely/aggressively. It tied in to the meaning behind the music, which isn't my place to discuss as TR tends to keep that stuff close to his chest. " The cover of the booklet is a new piece of artwork that depicts several light gray lines on a dark background (the same color as the one for 1,000,000). Five lines, two on the ends and three in the middle, all travel straight downward from the top edge to the bottom. Two more lines, in between the three middle and two outside, on each side, start straight downward, then slant inward, then travel straight downward parallel to the other lines before they would intersect the ones in the middle. These lines combined form a variation on the [[Logo History|NIN logo]] (second "N" being backwards).
==Multitracks==
9,953

edits